SCORE Central Pennsylvania

Chapter 618,  District 549

2820 East College Ave, Suite E

State College, PA 16801 

 p. (814)234-9415   

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER INFO

COUNSELING/MENTORING

BUSINESS TIPS

VOLUNTEERING

SCORE is a national nonprofit association dedicated to entrepreneur education and the formation, growth and success of America's Small Business. 

SCORE is resource partner of the

U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA)

 

SCORE Central Pennsylvania,

Chapter 618, District 459

2820 East College Ave, Suite E

State College, PA 16801 

(814) 234-9415

Webmaster:  John R. Vincenti

SCORE is a national association dedicated to entrepreneur education and the formation, growth and success of Small Business. 

SCORE is resource partner of the United States Small Business Administration (SBA).

SCORE Central Pennsylvania

Our Mission is to serve and provide Free & Confidential through Remote & Person-to-Person Counseling/Mentoring

 

 

 

SCORECPA.ORG

Beware of Fake Charities  and Return Advice-Falsifications

 

Hiding Money or Income Offshore

 

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today said avoiding taxes by hiding money or assets in unreported offshore accounts remains on its annual list of tax scams known as the “Dirty Dozen” for the 2015 filing season.

"Our continued enforcement actions should discourage anyone from trying to illegally hide money and income offshore," said IRS Commissioner John Koskinen. "We have voluntary options to help taxpayers get their taxes and filing obligations in order."

Since the first Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Program (OVDP) opened in 2009, there have been more than 54,000 disclosures and we have collected more than $8 billion from this initiative alone.  The IRS conducted thousands of offshore-related civil audits that have produced tens of millions of dollars. The IRS has also pursued criminal charges leading to billions of dollars in criminal fines and restitutions.

The IRS remains committed to our priority efforts to stop offshore tax evasion wherever it occurs.  Even though the IRS has faced several years of budget reductions, the IRS continues to pursue cases in all parts of the world, regardless of whether the person hiding money overseas chooses a bank with no offices on U.S. soil.

Through the years, offshore accounts have been used to lure taxpayers into scams and schemes.

Compiled annually, the “Dirty Dozen” lists a variety of common scams that taxpayers may encounter anytime, but many of these schemes peak during filing season as people prepare their returns or hire people to help with their taxes.

Illegal scams can lead to significant penalties and interest and possible criminal prosecution. IRS Criminal Investigation works closely with the Department of Justice (DOJ) to shut down scams and prosecute the criminals behind them.

Hiding Income Offshore

Over the years, numerous individuals have been identified as evading U.S. taxes by hiding income in offshore banks, brokerage accounts or nominee entities and then using debit cards, credit cards or wire transfers to access the funds. Others have employed foreign trusts, employee-leasing schemes, private annuities or insurance plans for the same purpose.

The IRS uses information gained from its investigations to pursue taxpayers with undeclared accounts, as well as the banks and bankers suspected of helping clients hide their assets overseas. The IRS works closely with the Department of Justice (DOJ) to prosecute tax evasion cases.

While there are legitimate reasons for maintaining financial accounts abroad, there are reporting requirements that need to be fulfilled. U.S. taxpayers who maintain such accounts and who do not comply with reporting requirements are breaking the law and risk significant penalties and fines, as well as the possibility of criminal prosecution.

Since 2009, tens of thousands of individuals have come forward voluntarily to disclose their foreign financial accounts, taking advantage of special opportunities to comply with the U.S. tax system and resolve their tax obligations. And, with new foreign account reporting requirements being phased in over the next few years, hiding income offshore is increasingly more difficult.

At the beginning of 2012, the IRS reopened the Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Program (OVDP) following continued strong interest from taxpayers and tax practitioners after the closure of the 2011 and 2009 programs. This program will be open for an indefinite period until otherwise announced.

Third-Party Reporting

Under the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA) and the network of intergovernmental agreements (IGAs) between the U.S. and  partner jurisdictions, automatic third-party account reportingbegan in 2015,  making it less likely that offshore financial accounts will go unnoticed by the IRS.

In addition to FATCA and reporting through IGAs, the Department of Justice’s Swiss Bank Program continues to reach non-prosecution agreements with Swiss financial institutions that facilitated past non-compliance.  As part of these agreements, banks provide information on potential non-compliance by U.S. taxpayers. Potential civil penalties increase substantially if U.S. taxpayers associated with participating banks wait to apply to OVDP to resolve their tax obligations.   IRS February 6, 2016 posting

 

Card Fraud     Business Fraud    Fraud actions ACH1 - ACH2      Perform Deep Security on Computer Disk Drives

Points of Interaction/Compromise   Small Biz Prevention - Detection